MIZUSEKI Kenji

写真a

Search Institutional Repository


Title

Professor

Laboratory location

Abeno Campus

Degree 【 display / non-display

  • Kyoto University -  Ph.D.

Research Areas 【 display / non-display

Neurophysiology / General neuroscience

Research subject summary 【 display / non-display

  • Coordinated patterns of neural activity spanning broad spatial and temporal scales underlie information processing in the brain. How are these activity patterns generated by intrinsic cellular properties, synaptic interactions, neuromodulatory systems, and network dynamics? How do these activity patterns carry out computational tasks that the brain attempts to perform? How are internally generated, self-organized network activities perturbed by the external world to produce perception and memory? Our goal is to quantitatively characterize and mechanistically explain information processing in terms of neuronal activity dynamics. Possible mechanisms subserving these processes include precisely structured sequences of activity, synchrony within and across brain regions, and dynamic grouping of local and global neuronal assemblies by network oscillations. These possibilities are testable only if we can simultaneously monitor the activities of many neurons and local field potentials in multiple regions of the intact brain at relevant time resolutions. To achieve our goal, we will employ large-scale electrophysiological recordings of neuronal ensembles in the hippocampus and its related structures in rats and mice while they perform various tasks and while at rest. In addition, we will combine in vivo electrophysiology and optogenetics to elucidate pathway- and cell type-specific functions in information processing.

Research Interests 【 display / non-display

oscillation, hippocampus, sleep, memory

Research Career 【 display / non-display

Education summary 【 display / non-display

  • Practical training for basic and social medicine
    Basic medical sciences program
    Cell biology
    Neuroscience
    Lab practice: physiology

Association Memberships 【 display / non-display

  • Society for Neuroscience

  • The Japan Neuroscience Society

  • Physiological Society of Japan

Current Career 【 display / non-display

  • Osaka City University   Graduate School of Medicine   Basic Medicine Course   Professor  

Career 【 display / non-display

  • 2012
    -
    2015

    Allen Institute for Brain Science   Senior Scientist

  • 2012
     
     

    New York University, School of Medicine   Research Assistant Professor

  • 2004
    -
    2012

    Rutgers University, Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience  

  • 2002
    -
    2004

    RIKEN, Center for Developmental Biology  

  • 2000
    -
    2002

    Institute for Frontier Medical Scieneces  

Graduate School 【 display / non-display

  •  
    -
    2000

    Kyoto University  Graduate School, Division of Medicine  Physiology 

Graduating School 【 display / non-display

  •  
    -
    1996

    Kyoto University   Faculty of Medicine   Faculty of Medicine

 

Published Papers 【 display / non-display

  • Theta oscillations decrease spike synchrony in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex.

    Mizuseki,K., and Buzsaki,G.

    Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond B Biol. Sci.  369   20120530 2014

  • Comparison of sleep spindles and theta oscillations in the hippocampus.

    Sullivan,D., Mizuseki,K., Sorgi,A., and Buzsaki,G.

    J. Neurosci.  34   662 - 674 2014

  • Spatially distributed local fields in the hippocampus encode rat position.

    Agarwal,G., Stevenson,I.H., Berenyi,A., Mizuseki,K., Buzsaki,G., and Sommer,F.T.

    Science  344   626 - 630 2014

  • Neurosharing: large-scale data sets (spike, LFP) recorded from the hippocampal-entorhinal system in behaving rats.

    F1000Res.  3   98 2014

  • Theta phase segregation of input-specific gamma patterns in entorhinal-hippocampal networks.

    Schomburg,E.W., Fernandez-Ruiz,A., Mizuseki,K., Berenyi,A., Anastassiou,C.A., Koch,C., and Buzsaki,G.

    Neuron  84   470 - 485 2014

display all >>

Books etc 【 display / non-display

  • Handbook of Sleep Research

    Mizuseki K, Miyawaki H (Part: Single Work )

    Academic Press/Elsevier  2019

  • ブレインサイエンス・レビュー 2018

    水関健司(睡眠―覚醒のサイクルにおける海馬の情報処理機構、pp.327-358) (Part: Single Work )

    クバプロ  2018

Review Papers (Misc) 【 display / non-display

display all >>

Conference Activities & Talks 【 display / non-display

  • 海馬台からの投射先特異的な情報分配メカニズム

    水関 健司

    第98回日本生理学会大会  2021.03 

  • インビボ大規模電気生理学

    水関 健司

    文部科学省新学術領域研究「マルチスケール精神病態の構成的理解」 第3回若手育成セミナー「神経回路の可視化・操作・モデリングのための最先端技術」  2020.12 

  • Robust information routing by dorsal subiculum neurons

    水関 健司

    Kumamoto University Program for Leading Graduate Schools: HIGO program cutting-edge seminar  2020.09 

  • Robust information routing by dorsal subiculum neurons

    水関 健司

    The 43rd Annual Meeting of the Japan Neuroscience Society  2020.07 

  • 大規模電気生理学と光遺伝学を用いた海馬の情報処理機構の解明

    水関 健司

    第10回 アルツハイマー病とてんかんを考える会 〜基礎から臨床まで〜  2020.02 

display all >>

Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research 【 display / non-display

  • Generation of region-specific neural cells from Embryonic Stem Cells

    Project/Area Number : 13680820  Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research(C) Representative

    Project Year :

    2001
    -
    2002
     

     View Summary

    Recently significant progress has been made in the molecular understanding of neural induction in Xenopus and Drosophila. By contrast, relatively little is known about molecular mechanisms of mammalian neural induction and generation of diverse neurons. Using mammalian Embryonic Stem (ES) cells, we are studying these issues.
    To begin with, we established an in vitro experimental system that induces neural differentiation of mouse and primate ES cells. Using co-culture system, we have identified neural inducing activity of ES cells in some stromal cells and named this activity Stromal Cell-Derived Inducing Activity (SDIA). Especially PA6 cells (stromal cells derived from skull bone marrow)efficiently (>90%) induce neural differentiation of ES cells.
    We next analyzed regional identities of SDIA-induced neural cells. SDlA-treated ES cells express forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain markers but not spinal cord markers. They express a variety of dorsal-ventral neural markers in terms of dorsal-ventral axis.
    Finally, we examined the capacity of SDIA-treated ES cells to generate a wide variety of neural cell types. Retinoic Acid modified SDIA-treated ES cells into the caudal direction. Shh suppressed dorsal neural markers and induce ventral Central Nervous System tissues, such as motor neurons and floor plate cells. BMP4 suppressed ventral neural markers and induced dorsal and neural crest markers. Thus SDIA-treated ES cells have the competence to respond to patterning factors, such as Retinoic Acid, Shh and BMP4, and can be modified to region-specific neural cells.

  • Generation of region-specific neural cells from Embryonic Stem Cells

    Project/Area Number : 13680820  Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research(C) Representative

    Project Year :

    2001
    -
    2002
     

     View Summary

    Recently significant progress has been made in the molecular understanding of neural induction in Xenopus and Drosophila. By contrast, relatively little is known about molecular mechanisms of mammalian neural induction and generation of diverse neurons. Using mammalian Embryonic Stem (ES) cells, we are studying these issues.
    To begin with, we established an in vitro experimental system that induces neural differentiation of mouse and primate ES cells. Using co-culture system, we have identified neural inducing activity of ES cells in some stromal cells and named this activity Stromal Cell-Derived Inducing Activity (SDIA). Especially PA6 cells (stromal cells derived from skull bone marrow)efficiently (>90%) induce neural differentiation of ES cells.
    We next analyzed regional identities of SDIA-induced neural cells. SDlA-treated ES cells express forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain markers but not spinal cord markers. They express a variety of dorsal-ventral neural markers in terms of dorsal-ventral axis.
    Finally, we examined the capacity of SDIA-treated ES cells to generate a wide variety of neural cell types. Retinoic Acid modified SDIA-treated ES cells into the caudal direction. Shh suppressed dorsal neural markers and induce ventral Central Nervous System tissues, such as motor neurons and floor plate cells. BMP4 suppressed ventral neural markers and induced dorsal and neural crest markers. Thus SDIA-treated ES cells have the competence to respond to patterning factors, such as Retinoic Acid, Shh and BMP4, and can be modified to region-specific neural cells.